Redmon recognized for administration and leadership

Writer: Kay Ledbetter The Texas A&M AgriLife Vice Chancellor’s Awards in Excellence – Administration honor was presented to Dr. Larry Redmon at a ceremony Jan. 7 on the Texas A&M University campus in College Station. The Vice Chancellor’s Awards, established in 1980, recognize the commitment and outstanding contributions of faculty and staff across Texas A&M AgriLife, and represent the highest level of achievement for the organization. Redmon has provided leadership as the associate department head and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service program leader for the department of soil… Read More →

Texas A&M Vice Chancellor’s teaching award presented to Hague

Writer: Kay Ledbetter   The Texas A&M AgriLife Vice Chancellor’s Award in Excellence – Teaching Award was presented to Dr. Steve Hague, a soil and crops science department professor, during a ceremony Jan. 7 at Texas A&M University in College Station. The awards, established in 1980, recognize the commitment and outstanding contributions of faculty and staff across Texas A&M AgriLife, and represent the highest level of achievement for the organization. Hague has consistently demonstrated a commitment to teaching over the last decade, according to his nomination. He worked… Read More →

Manipulation of gossypol-containing glands in cotton can boost plant’s natural defenses

By: Kay Ledbetter   Development of a cotton plant with stronger natural defenses due to a greater gland density and thus more gossypol in the leaves could soon be a reality, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research plant biotechnologist in College Station. Seeds and other parts of cotton possess dark glands containing toxic terpenoids such as gossypol that defend the plant against pests and pathogens, said Dr. Keerti Rathore, AgriLife Research plant biotechnologist in the Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology at Texas A&M University. Rathore and… Read More →

Coffee Education Symposium held at Texas A&M

Writer: Beth Ann Luedeker Coffee researchers, roasters and others with an interest in coffee gathered at the Scotts turfgrass facility on the Texas A&M University campus to discuss opportunities for coffee research. “Coffee is not one of our top crops, but millions of pounds are roasted and consumed in Texas each year,” said Dr. Leo Lombardini, Horticulture Professor and Director of the Texas A&M Coffee Center. “In the Houston area alone, there are about 100 small roasters and 15 large roasters.” Coffee is an important commodity for the… Read More →

New chemistries tested for weed control in corn

Writer: Kay Ledbetter, 806-677-5608, skledbetter@ag.tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Jourdan Bell, 806-677-5600, Jourdan.bell@ag.tamu.edu While producers may find newer corn herbicides on the market, it is important to look herbicide performance under regional environmental conditions before making any large purchases, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist. There are many good herbicides on the market, but producers often find that some herbicides perform poorly under stressful Texas High Plains conditions, said Dr. Jourdan Bell, AgriLife Extension agronomist in Amarillo. Bell said there were many good tank-mix options providing very good… Read More →

Students participate in research Down Under

Writer: Beth Ann Luedeker Educators know that hands-on experience is a critical part of learning, and Texas A&M University offers many opportunities for students to study abroad, conduct research and participate in internships. This past summer two doctoral students under the supervision of Dr. Cristine Morgan had the opportunity to do all that in Australia. Dianna Bagnall, a soil science major, and Cody Bagnall, a biological and agricultural engineering student, participated in the “Australia-Americas Ph.D. Internship”, a program run through the Australian Academy of Science. During the program,… Read More →

Neely named president of Texas Plant Protection Assn.

Writer: Beth Ann Luedeker Dr. Clark Neely, Soil and Crop Sciences Assistant Professor and AgriLife Extension small grains and oilseed specialist, was named as the new president of the Texas Plant Protection Association at their 30th annual conference December 5. Neely joined the department as a graduate research assistant in 2010 after earning his Master of Science in Plant Science from the University of Idaho. He received his B.S. in Agriculture Extension and Education with minors in Agronomy and Animal Science from The Pennsylvania State University. He has… Read More →

Noland joins as agronomist in San Angelo

Writer: Blair Fannin Dr. Reagan Noland has joined the soil and crop sciences department as the the AgriLife Extension agronomist specializing in crop management at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in San Angelo. It’s a homecoming of sorts for Noland, who grew up in the San Angelo area helping his grandparents with farm and ranch production. “I am excited to be back here, and I look forward to serving the agricultural community and working to improve the resilience and profitability of our systems,” Noland said…. Read More →

Stelly named AAAS Fellow

By: Kay Ledbetter Writer: Kay Ledbetter, 806-677-5608, skledbetter@ag.tamu.edu Contact: Dr. David Stelly, 979-845-2745, stelly@tamu.edu WASHINGTON, D.C. – Dr. David Stelly has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science or AAAS. Stelly, a professor of cytogenetics, genetics, genomics and plant breeding in the soil and crop sciences department, holds a joint appointment with Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Texas A&M University in College Station. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers, according to the association…. Read More →

Few options to salvage late-season hay amid wet weather

Writer: Adam Russell, 903-834-6191, adam.russell@ag.tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Vanessa Corriher-Olson, 903-834-6191, vacorriher@ag.tamu.edu Warm-season grasses are plentiful in hay producing areas, but the rain that helped improve growing conditions following an extended period of drought is hurting their chances for more round bales, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert. Dr. Vanessa Corriher-Olson, AgriLife Extension forage specialist, Overton, said late-season rains created good growing conditions for warm-season grasses over the last 60 days following months of drought that left hay supplies low around the state. She said while grasses… Read More →